Listening with Lipari and Bessette

In this post I offer a combined annotation of two articles.  The first is Audio, Archives, and the Affordance of Listening in a Pedagogy of “Difference” by Jean Bessette, and the latter is Rhetoric’s Other:  Levinas, Listening, and the Ethical Response by Lisbeth Lipari. In a podcast-like discussion, I attempt to bring both of these works together to process the following questions: How are digital media transforming the potential audiences for academic discourse? How is listening a “multimodal” activity? What if our understanding of critical thinking through writing were expanded to include critical thinking through musical/sonic composition? To put it another way, should we still be privileging a print-centered definition of literacy when the web is a multimodal authoring and reading environment? To what extent are classical models or definitions (Socratic, Aristotelian, Pre-Socratic, etc.) of rhetoric still relevant? Also highlight and define (sonically!) key and unfamiliar terms in the text you choose. Not all of these questions will be fully answered, but hopefully the format of the podcast below will give rise to more thought on these subjects. Please be advised: NONE of the Audio clips that I tried to include came through on SoundCloud.  I must ask, therefore, that you explore the works that I referenced in on your own.  They appear below in the order of their intended appearance, so please take a moment to listen to the beginning part of Sacrifice and any section of the interviews during the long gaps in the Podcast. Useful Sounds, Links, and Sources Nikki Giovanni–Soul Food, Sex, and Space March 17, 2016. On Being. Photo by the Furious Flower Poetry Center. Katy Payne–In the Presence...

CTW: Humphrey and Hulin

“Where can we find authority in a book with multiple authors working in different modalities? (Humphrey 5)” In his comic “Multimodal Authorship and Authority in Educational Comics: Introducing Foucault and Derrida for Beginners,” Aaron Humphrey explores the idea of authority and how it is embodied through multimodal texts with multiple authors. He does this by examining various examples of “An Introduction…” and “For Beginners” books, specifically those that speak on the theories of Foucault and Derrida. Experimenting with writing in a comic and analyzing collaborative comics allows Humphrey to question how we have previously viewed academic writing, and his techniques aid in decentralizing the voice of authority that is so prevalent in the academic sphere. Rachel Hulin pioneers a new kind of composition in her novel “Hey Harry Hey Matilda.” One of the captivating elements of her work is that it exists in two spaces: Instagram and a blog-style website. Her story follows twins Matilda and Harry Goodman as they navigate adulthood together; their dialogue features everything from relationships and psychological states to genetic testing and aging. The secret to their relationship, though, is that they seem to be fighting feelings for each other. Their conversations are nostalgic, yet modern and laced with anxiety. Hulin posts new segments of their story on Instagram every few days or so, sometimes every day, but it varies; alternatively, on the website, Hulin provides segments in posts that the audience can scroll through in chronological order. How do these pieces interact? Hulin’s work directly embodies Humphrey’s decentralization of authority. Whether the audience is looking at the story through Instagram or through the website, it...

CTW 3

Comics have entered the classroom, and educators have taken notice. Traditionally viewed in academia as less than, comics had been relegated to the realm of entertainment. Now, however, academics have begun to understand that comics enable a presentation of information in different ways than traditional academic texts allow. Comics are bridging the gap between the public and the academic, and deconstructing complex ideas for general consumption. The rise of comics within the classroom and the academic realm has inspired discussions on the construction of comics as multimodal texts, the validity of comic arguments, and the challenges this imposes on the traditional academic power structure. In creative presentations of dissertations, two academics have explored the concepts of the rise and the power within and behind a comic book. Aaron Scott Humphrey wrote the comic/dissertation, Multimodal Authoring and Authority in Educational Comics: Introducing Derrida and Foucault for Beginners, in which he explores the collaborative nature of comic construction, and the struggle for voice and authority that arises within a multiple person creation. Nick Sousanis presented his dissertation in the comic, Unflattening, which he discussed in an interview with Steve Dahlberg and Mary Alice Long on BlogTalkRadio, “Artist Nick Sousanis on the Power of Visuals (& Comics) on Learning & Creativity.” Sousanis’ work explores the challenge comics provide the academic structure, opening content to a broader audience by breaking down complex arguments with visual aids. Multimodal compositions have grown in number with the rise of technology. But utilizing multiple modes in creating a text of sorts is not confined to a computer. By looking at comics, we can examine multimodal compositions that...

Things vs. Humans

Jane Bennett’s lecture points to the power struggle between things and humans that exists in our consumerist culture, but perhaps we shouldn’t be so harsh on ourselves from the get-go by referring to our twenty-first century culture as “consumerist”.  Humans have always placed great significance on things, things we own, things we want to own, things that own us.  We have always been a consumerist culture.  In fact, if you look back to one of the most famous creation stories, the one from the Bible, you see consumerist culture displayed within the first few pages.  The first woman, Eve, wanted that piece of fruit.  To use Bennett’s words, “it called to her” in all of its unatainability.  The fruit and what it symbolized ruled over her because she wanted to own or master the knowledge that it would provide.  And in the end, we all know the story I presume, it debunked her from her lordly position, resulting in her slavery for the rest of her days. The moral of the story?  “Don’t let your things own you”. Got it. And that is precisely what we have tried to do.  We have tried to stay lord over the things of this world by considering them to be objects in our subject versus object conversations.  We have denied them autonomy, claimed that they do not have true consciousness, and have even ignored facts in order to do so. A great example of this would be our posture towards animals.  We have a few tendencies here: to view them as our servants (think mules, donkeys, dogs), our products (I am thinking specifically of the food industry...

CTW Response: Clemens/Nash and Rizzo

“Since the very concept of media by definition presumes that there are media, plural (for example, differentiated media), and since the digital converges all media into a single state (that is to say digital data), then by definition the concept of media simply disappears. In other words, data is the Great Leveler” (Clemens and Nash). In their piece “Being and Media: digital ontology after the event of the end of media,” Justin Clemens and Adam Nash discuss their ideas of digital ontology. Clemens and Nash argue that the digital age has unified our media into a single medium, data, and that data is simply modulated into the various forms that we recognize today. In “Television Assemblages,” Teresa Rizzo speaks on the multiplatform nature of modern television and how it has transformed the television viewer. She calls into question the traditional mass audience of television and uses three modern functions of television as evidence of this shift: “pay per view,  search and retrieve, and and upload and share” (Rizzo). Additionally, she analyzes assemblage theory and discusses how it disrupts typical social (and therefore, rhetorical) constructs. The Emergence of Digital Rhetoric The emergence of rhetoric in the digital space has disrupted the way we think about rhetoric. In their article, Clemens and Nash argue that instead of having multiple mediums, data has become the one true medium through which we communicate. This is an interesting way to think about rhetoric’s emergence because it shifts our previous conceptions of rhetoric and composition studies. “For anything to appear in the digital realm—here, in the usual acception of ‘digital media’—it must first be digitised to data,...
css.php