Stanley E. Jones and Curtis D. LeBaron’s “Research on the Relationship Between Verbal and Nonverbal Communication” Gestural Annotations

In Stanley E. Jones and Curtis D. LeBaron’s article “Research on the Relationship Between Verbal and Nonverbal Communication: Emerging Integrations,” the pair argue that for years verbal and nonverbal communications have been studied separately. They urge for researchers to study the relationship between the two as part of a whole. Below are my gestural annotations for the article. (source: Smithsonian Magazine) Cultural respect (handshake). (source: Stratosphere Studio) “Demonstrative Suffering” (Heath) (source: ETQT Etiquette)...

Gestural Annotation: Jones and LeBaron

This girl’s dance may not show a direct relationship between verbal and nonverbal communication, but she is the definition of “like.” She watched dancers on YouTube, and she modified her dancing style to dance like them. This gestural communication seems to be rooted in the “like” of human communication. They didn’t teach her directly, but their bodies communicated with her. Like the study described on page 514 of the journal, the audio of this video would be slightly difficult to interpret without seeing the accompanying gestures. In order to fully understand the relationship between verbal and nonverbal communication, we cannot separate them. Sources: Oakley, Tyler. “Flirting in Sign Language (ft. Nyle DiMarco) | Tyler Oakley.” YouTube. YouTube, 2016. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. Fusion. “This Amazing Girl Mastered Dubstep Dancing by Just Using YouTube.” YouTube. YouTube, 25 Jan. 2016. Web. 19 Apr....

Lisbeth Lipari’s “Rhetoric Other” Sonic Annotations

“Rhetoric’s Other: Levinas, Listening, and the Ethical Response” by Lisbeth Lipari sonic annotations. In Lipari’s article, she argues that audiences have favored speaking over listening. I am reminded of Donald Trump and his speeches in that his verbiage and overall tone seem to trump (no pun intended) his actual meaning or, often, logic, in favor of being loud and threatening.  ...

“Rhetoric’s Other” Annotations

Sonic annotations of Lisbeth Lipari’s “Rhetoric’s Other: Levinas, Listening, and the Ethical Response” http://sites.gsu.edu/mjohnson215/files/2016/04/Can-You-Hear-Me-Now-SoundBible.com-1714117681-15gqlkd.mp3 Interesting difference between hearing and listening… “Can you hear me now?” unknown artist, via Creative Commons and SoundBible.com _____________________________________________________________________   http://sites.gsu.edu/mjohnson215/files/2016/04/Sergey_Cheremisinov_-_02_-_Crystal_Echoes-18ogkhg.mp3 “…language reverberates with the echoes of every utterance ever spoken” (238) “Crystal Echoes” from Sea and Night by Sergey Cheremisinov, via Creative Commons and the Free Music Archive. _____________________________________________________________________ Only Human, “Listen Up! Day 1: Face-to-Face” from WNYC...

Annotations 3/29

“Hey Harry Hey Matilda” Image by Wim Mulder, “Writing to Reach You,” via Flickr and Creative Commons. “Letters” by Mariya Chorna via Flickr and Creative Commons. “Collage,” by Andrew Gustar via Flickr and Creative Commons. ____________________________________________________________________________ Nick Sousanis, on the “Power of Visuals (& Comics) on Learning & Creativity,” on BlogTalkRadio “Boundaries” by Jon Wiley, by way of Flickr and Creative Commons. “Bridge” by Astrid Westvang via Flickr and Creative Commons. 17.8.12 by mariasphotography via Flickr and Creative...

Visual Annotations on Aaron Scott Humphrey’s “Multimodal Authoring and Authority in Digital Writing Environments”

Visual annotations for Aaron Scott Humphrey’s “Multimodal Authoring and Authority in Digital Writing Environments: Introducing Derrida and Foucault For Beginners” (from Digital Humanities Quarterly).   (source: Cartoon Stock)   Academic writing has often been very stiff and usually only involves few mediums (pen, paper, black text on a white background). Not until the last twenty years has academic writing been digital, but what’s to say that academic writing has to be boring? Why can’t it be multimodal and involve images, videos, audio, etc.? (source: Digital Humanities) Humphrey’s use of images and “beginner” easy-to read text makes learning about digital writing and the works of Jacques Derrida and Michel Foucault fun and educational. In his article, Humphrey examines the relationship between the designer, the writer, and the artist and how spacial, visual, and logistical elements work together (and sometimes against each other). (source: Conde Nast Store) For decades, political cartoons have long been used as rhetorical devices. (source:Board Game Geek) Overall, the use of visuals and spacial elements can come together to convey an overall meaning and persuade the reader. Sometimes, according to Humphrey, the two can work against one another, and not in unison as a team. (source: Teach)...
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