Capstone Peer Review Update

Currently,  I’m researching the topics of death, materiality, and tavern culture. I have chosen an artifact—the memorial plaque of Bud Foote. via Georgia Tech Foote was a regular at Manuel’s Tavern and an important person to the Atlanta community as an English professor at Georgia Tech and the co-founder of the Atlanta Folk Music Society. Here’s a video from the Georgia Tech video archive, an oral history interview with Foote himself:   The artifact I aim to produce via Scalar will be a combination of research, theory, material culture study and oral history interview presented in a digital medium.  In addition to my artifact, I’m working alongside Unpacking Manuel’s to help research artifacts in the archive and connect researchers with points of contact in the community. In order to reflect the current state of my work, I’ve updated my workflow chart:...

Summary-Observation

Because of my interest in working in higher education and my desire to stay with the rhetoric & composition focus, I reached out to Ph.D. student Matthew Sansbury. Matthew teaches composition at Georgia State and also works for SAMLA. I had the pleasure of being Matthew’s classmate last semester in Dr. Harker’s graduate seminar about literacy studies. Observing Matthew gave me some new insights into the work that he is doing with his composition students and how that might inform my decision to move forward. Matthew identifies as a feminist scholar, and his approach to teaching composition is through the study of communities. I had the chance to see some of his students presenting their findings on the discourse communities they studied. Some reported on religious communities—Scientology and Jehovah’s Witnesses. Still others reported on Greek organizations at Georgia State. Some students took a different approach, addressing issues rather than communities, as one did with her consideration of texting and driving. Matthew also pointed out his alignment with critical literacy/pedagogy, which dovetails in interesting ways with feminist philosophy. He noted that his goal was to help students learn to apply a theoretical framework, as with feminism, as a lens for understanding or critiquing. He employs teacher feedback toward the correction of errors—highlighting the types of errors and offering opportunities to revise. Primarily, his research focus has been on multimodality and aural/sonic rhetoric. Sansbury’s goal is to seek a tenure-track position. He’s been working hard to publish during his time in graduate school, and recently presented a talk at the CCCC last week in Houston. One of Matthew’s strong suits that...

Modal Collisions

Just press play. This is Sun Ra from 04/04/1981. The works of Nick Sousanis and Aaron Humprey complicate the place of print in scholarship by focusing on the interplay between the visual and linguistic modes as a way of creating meaning out of a relationship between image and text. http://danieltlamb.tumblr.com/post/141489175838/fluidity-by-robertojeda-via-flickr-fine Sun Ra’s music can, in an analogical way, function much in the same way as compositions which approach scholarship through multiple modes. Sun Ra disrupts form, style, and melody to create a kind of destabilized, post-structural musical aesthetic. This work might sound simultaneously like gobbledygook to one listener and like rhapsodic genius to another; in this sense, his musical aesthetic is located within the postmodern. via GIPHY via GIPHY These two GIF’s, the cats simulating a Jedi battle and Edward Norton’s character from Fight Club, can serve as a kind of juxtaposition to illustrate this dialectic between the notion of the asinine and the simulacrum. Perhaps this pairing of GIF’s can express this feeling of absurd distraction coupled with existential dejection better than this sentence performs or ellicits such a meaning. In speaking about this link between visual and linguistic narrative, Sousanis points out his conscious choice to remove discipline- and academic-specific language from his dissertation. Those words about education and schooling don’t appear in the text. How can one make something that people will read? Words in metaphorical language, verbal and visual, can engage people in their own place so that they can stay with the work and get something out of it without withdrawing away, letting the audience come up to the argument. Here, he’s making the...
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