Career Review Presentation

After reading Leonard Mogel’s thorough novel on being successful in public relations and interviewing one of GSU’s own PR specialists, I have created a presentation that gives a brief overview of what PR professionals really do in the field. To see my Prezi, click the following link: http://prezi.com/nxfpy0hkzy5t/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy The presentation gives a brief overview of typical jobs in public relations and the education required to enter the field. For more detailed information, explore my book review. For real-life information from a PR specialist here at GSU, check out my interview with LaTina Emerson. I hope this presentation makes PR a bit easier to understand. Instead of getting caught up in Olivia Pope’s version of public relations, remember that PR professionals are communicators, just like us.  ...

Gestural Annotation: Jones and LeBaron

This girl’s dance may not show a direct relationship between verbal and nonverbal communication, but she is the definition of “like.” She watched dancers on YouTube, and she modified her dancing style to dance like them. This gestural communication seems to be rooted in the “like” of human communication. They didn’t teach her directly, but their bodies communicated with her. Like the study described on page 514 of the journal, the audio of this video would be slightly difficult to interpret without seeing the accompanying gestures. In order to fully understand the relationship between verbal and nonverbal communication, we cannot separate them. Sources: Oakley, Tyler. “Flirting in Sign Language (ft. Nyle DiMarco) | Tyler Oakley.” YouTube. YouTube, 2016. Web. 19 Apr. 2016. Fusion. “This Amazing Girl Mastered Dubstep Dancing by Just Using YouTube.” YouTube. YouTube, 25 Jan. 2016. Web. 19 Apr....

Interview Summary

Getting a Start in Public Relations Last week, I had the pleasure of sitting down with LaTina Emerson, one of Georgia State’s Public Relations Specialists. Ms. Emerson composes articles and press releases that pertain to significant scientific research at the University, and she promotes the scholarly work that professors are publishing.  Ms. Emerson’s career, though impressive, was accidental. As an undergrad, Emerson studied Psychology and Pre-Med, but instead of going straight to medical school, she decided to pursue a M.F.A. in Screenwriting at Boston University. After a short stint writing about business for a newspaper in Georgia, Emerson took a position at the Augusta Chronicle as a business reporter. The struggle of writing about business in the recession prompted her to look into other options: thus began her career in PR. After working in media relations for the Colleges of Dental Medicine and Nursing at Augusta College, Emerson found herself missing the bustle of a bigger city and took her current position at Georgia State. She enjoys what she does here at GSU because it allows her to combine her interest in scientific research and her love of writing. She has published numerous articles and press releases for the University, but her favorite story so far is “America’s Prescription Drug Abuse Epidemic.”  “It kind of took on a whole life of its own,” she reflects. The original story was supposed to focus on the work of GSU’s Dr. Eric Wright, but after researching the issue, Emerson discovered the inherent connection between prescription drug abuse and the heroin epidemic. “It just kind of snowballed into this bigger thing,” she remembers....

Sonic Annotation: Stadler

Besides the visual implications of this video, listen closely to the lyrics and how they sound. Why did so many people take offense to this song? Beyoncé is celebrating black culture. Her voice is raw and unapologetic, and for a white audience that is accustomed to hearing her melodic voice, this version of Beyoncé’s music is provocative. Mainstream music is historically white, and Beyoncé tore that barrier down. http://sites.gsu.edu/dreed12/files/2016/04/165166__goose278__8-police-cars-passing-w-sirens-1emb7hi.wav When looking at sound studies, human diversity must be discussed. Since I grew up in a relatively safe neighborhood (and honestly, since I’m white), I don’t feel fear when I hear police sirens.  The dichotomies that Stadler poses and identifies are not wholly unrealistic, as racial identity plays a large part in a person’s reaction to this sound. If we are to truly analyze the sonic branch of rhetoric, we must take demographics and personal experiences into context. Sound credit: goose278 http://sites.gsu.edu/dreed12/files/2016/04/180685__screenplaytheater__st-chair-ruckus-127wxgg.wav When I think about the struggle between races, I hear a physical struggle with something. Racism is often thought of as an idea: an abstract thing that we can only fight through ideology. But racism, to those who experience it, is real and concrete. The study of sonic rhetoric has the chance to modify academic discourse because it allows us to look beyond the textual and visual elements of racism and examine inequality in other areas, such as radio and music. Sound credit: ScreenplayTheatre The difference between hearing and listening is exemplified in this famous song by The Police. Many people listen to this song and hear a man talking about an ex-lover, but when actually listening, the...

Sonic Annotations- Lipari

  http://sites.gsu.edu/dreed12/files/2016/04/133997__davidkyoku__bending-effect-electric-guitar-1rcmw3p.wav Lipari speaks on the philosophy of Levinas and how his ideas tend to “blur” the division between speech and ethics. When I think of this blur, I don’t imagine a foggy photo. I see a bend, but not one that is uniform. I don’t see a bend in the road or the bend in a bobby pin; rather, I hear a sound that bounces back and forth. Instead of bending once in one direction, the sound in this clip bends away from its original pitch multiple times. http://sites.gsu.edu/dreed12/files/2016/04/155042__e330__regent-s-conversation-2m2zoj2.wav We often underestimate the importance of listening. Remember when our elementary school teachers told us to “put our listening ears on?” Why do we treat listening as something that has to be chosen, rather than something that is a crucial component to basic communication? Listening is seen as the “other,” but it is essential. Sound credit: E330 http://sites.gsu.edu/dreed12/files/2016/04/255191__wadaltmon__spanish-request-1nne8bu.wav Maybe one of the reasons we resist composing with sound is because it is harder to pin down. Writing is more straightforward, and even if something is written in a language that is foreign to the reader, there is most likely a translation in existence or someone that could translate the text. Sound is harder; we try so hard to illicit images with the sounds we create, but what about how sounds make us feel? Sound credit: Wadaltmon http://sites.gsu.edu/dreed12/files/2016/04/325647__shadydave__expressions-of-the-mind-piano-loop-pmtnau.mp3 Listening is multimodal activity. We don’t simply listen with our ears, we listen with our minds and our feelings. It’s rare that we passively listen to music; i.e., why are there mood playlists on Spotify? Music and sound don’t just rift through...
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