CTW Response Essay #3

Aaron Scott Humphrey, in his review of educational comics, raises some very interesting questions for art and academia as a whole. Even when the two are not merged in such a circumstance as an educational comic, there are certain conventions followed by each individually which significantly limit the scope of potential for both. From the title, which includes the words “Authorship and Authority,” one might assume that this text endorses the establishment of a strong writing (or more broadly “creating”) voice in order to control a piece and imprint a sense of ownership on it, but this is not necessarily the case. In fact, Humphrey explores a quite contrary notion in his analysis of Marx for Beginners and of other works as well. Humphrey finds it notable that the author Rius uses different characters and different handwriting/typesetting to embody different voices from different authors and as a result yields a degree of his own authority to the people who he cites in his work. The effect of this, not the particular technique itself, but the notion of yielding “authorship and authority,” is impactful not only for these individual works but potentially for the entire world of academia. Whether it’s the writing of Bill Finger, the voice of Kevin Conroy, the directing of Christopher Nolan, or the acting of everyone from Adam West to Ben Affleck, Batman is a Gestalt creation, the end result of years of contributions from widely various sources, a constantly modified entity whose nature in many ways remains true to his original iterations and in many ways adapts to our rapidly changing world, and so, now,...

Final Annotations!!!

“Listening to Phonocentrism with Deaf Eyes: Derrida’s Mute Philosophy of (Sign) Language” H-Dirksen Bauman Gallaudet University Language, in sign language Sign Language Poetry: “The Light” and a performance art piece, “Unleashed from...

Career Review: Freelance Writing

What does a dream career look like for tech-savvy millennials? I assert that it includes the ability to travel, to be your own boss, to wear your pajamas to work, to work according to your own schedule, and to, in general, avoid the restrictive feeling of the dreaded office job.  Not surprisingly, the first career to which millennial English majors are often tempted to turn is freelance writing.  The job appears glorious, much like the idea of homeschooling looks to public middle-schoolers and to people who have never been home schooled. What English majors, like disgruntled public-schooled students, do not see in the career is the discipline involved in finding work and in producing writing even when the pay is slight and the jobs are few.  The freelancer is constantly on the hunt, looking for articles to write through online sources (such as Freelance Writing Jobs, Freelance Writing, or Be a Frelance Blogger), endless submissions to the same newspaper that has turned them down about ten times already, and finally finding gigs that may not relate to how they thought they would be writing.  Very few authors suddenly rise to fame as the result of one or even a few articles.  More often, in fact, the pay is so unpredictable that it is nearly impossible to make a living without a secondary source of income.  Timothy Lemire seeks to demystify freelance writing in chapter seven of his book titled appropriately I’m an English Major – Now What?: How English Majors Can Find Happiness, Success, and a Real Job.   The following presentation seeks to further explain and demystify this career...

Career Review Presentation

After reading Leonard Mogel’s thorough novel on being successful in public relations and interviewing one of GSU’s own PR specialists, I have created a presentation that gives a brief overview of what PR professionals really do in the field. To see my Prezi, click the following link: http://prezi.com/nxfpy0hkzy5t/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy The presentation gives a brief overview of typical jobs in public relations and the education required to enter the field. For more detailed information, explore my book review. For real-life information from a PR specialist here at GSU, check out my interview with LaTina Emerson. I hope this presentation makes PR a bit easier to understand. Instead of getting caught up in Olivia Pope’s version of public relations, remember that PR professionals are communicators, just like us.  ...

Career Review Presentation

My career review presentation can be viewed on Prezi. A copy of the interview transcript is found below:     What is the typical length of study as a graduate student? It varies depending on the program, how quickly a student is able to finish their coursework, how long it takes them to finish their thesis, etc. I’m wrapping up my fourth year, with one left to go, but I have friends who entered the MFA program at the same time I did—or even later!—who are graduating this spring. So it’s possible to finish the MFA program in three years, but it takes a certain degree of monomaniacal focus that I don’t really have, I think. (For one thing, it means taking the comp exam and turning in your thesis the same semester, almost immediately after finishing your coursework, which…yeesh. Good for them if they can pull it off, though.) This program can offer no more than four years of funding for MFA students, and five years for PhD students—but I didn’t start receiving funding until halfway through my second year, so I’m still covered through next spring. How many hours per week do you dedicate to your graduate classes? (This may include actual credit hours and/or time spent doing work outside of class.) It depends on the class, really. For most lit studies classes, we end up reading about a book a week (maybe two weeks for longer books), along with supplementary materials, our own written work, etc. It’s been a couple of years since I was last taking a full load of classes, but I remember it taking…most...
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