Digital Capstone Project Abstract

Local Atlanta Bands Abstract Local Atlanta Bands is part of my digital capstone project for English 4320. It aims to highlight emerging indie music coming on to the Atlanta scene. The rhetorical choice of the blog is short, easy to read profiles of bands that is intended to be read on-the-go, or if the reader only has a few minutes (mostly due in part to readability online slowed by 30%). It utilizes multimodality and provides the reader with pictures, videos, sound clips, links, and basic band information. I started the project for Dr. Holmes’ Digital Writing and Publishing course last spring, and decided to continue the project. I am proud of the work I put into my project, and I hope the audience enjoys what I’ve produced. Local Atlanta...

Show Review: “Squad Season”

Hip-hop’s overall artistic climate, like many others, has been increasingly hybridized in recent years. People are now more than ever resisting the staunch segregation of rappers into “gangsta” and “conscious” factions. This resistance, which to be clear has always existed, is being galvanized in my opinion by an increasing awareness that the division of rappers in this way is corny, arbitrary, and largely imposed by external forces (y’all know which ones). This leads me to Squad Season. Broken in its initial inception into two parts, “The Party” and “The Show,” Squad Season is a homegrown, scene-specific, music-centered, event series that just launched on April 15th.The Party, held on the 15th, was thrown with the intention to generate hype for The Show to be held one week later on the 22nd. This decision was more rhetorical than anything, the benefits of which are more clearly illuminated in hindsight. Not only did the party generate hype as intended, but it generated community. The people in attendance mingled, talked, danced, and ultimately forged a sort of nanoculture that persisted until The Show next week. The bill for The Show consisted of eleven different rappers: john.AVERAGE, P.U.R.E., Kaedus Hines., Shalom Little, Rhonnie O’Neal, Bias laRose, Glenn Saddler, Nihlus, Yani Mo, Jamee Cornelia, and Eriiic J. In an effort to avoid both the stereotype of the preachy “conscious” rapper and that of the myopic “gangsta” rapper, all simply presented their authentic selves, which like most people, occupied spaces both between and beyond the two categories. The eleven emcees rapped about topics ranging from racism and police brutality to the type of sex, drugs, and...
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