Digital Capstone Composition Proposal

Abstract After exploring Rachel Hulin’s “Hey Harry Hey Matilda” on Instagram and through her website, I was enamored with the idea of developing a novel for the web. Jessica and I plan to write our own narrative for the web; like “Hey Harry Hey Matilda,” the narrative will be available as installments on Instagram and as a navigable website. The website will be my primary focus, as Jessica will be developing her narrative through Instagram. I had originally planned to use Tumblr, but after exploring the site, I believe a WordPress site would create the brand recognition I’m looking for. During my time in entrepreneurship courses, I have been disappointed to find that the creative aspect of marketing is often lost in the search for a profit. Today’s marketing is product and service driven. I want to create a brand that does not necessarily exist to turn a profit; although Jessica plans to continue working with this project after graduation, my goal is to build a space online that allows users to engage with our novel. This digital space will create brand recognition by disrupting the way people are used to reading; it will provide information regarding the novel and its content, but it will force readers to be active participants in the brand. My audience will be Dr. Wharton and other faculty in the Rhetoric and Composition concentration. Instead of using this project as a chance to demonstrate my writing skills, I would like to demonstrate my ability to create appropriate content for the web and to build an online platform that appeals to an academic audience. The...

Annotations 3/29

“Hey Harry Hey Matilda” Image by Wim Mulder, “Writing to Reach You,” via Flickr and Creative Commons. “Letters” by Mariya Chorna via Flickr and Creative Commons. “Collage,” by Andrew Gustar via Flickr and Creative Commons. ____________________________________________________________________________ Nick Sousanis, on the “Power of Visuals (& Comics) on Learning & Creativity,” on BlogTalkRadio “Boundaries” by Jon Wiley, by way of Flickr and Creative Commons. “Bridge” by Astrid Westvang via Flickr and Creative Commons. 17.8.12 by mariasphotography via Flickr and Creative...

Modal Collisions

Just press play. This is Sun Ra from 04/04/1981. The works of Nick Sousanis and Aaron Humprey complicate the place of print in scholarship by focusing on the interplay between the visual and linguistic modes as a way of creating meaning out of a relationship between image and text. http://danieltlamb.tumblr.com/post/141489175838/fluidity-by-robertojeda-via-flickr-fine Sun Ra’s music can, in an analogical way, function much in the same way as compositions which approach scholarship through multiple modes. Sun Ra disrupts form, style, and melody to create a kind of destabilized, post-structural musical aesthetic. This work might sound simultaneously like gobbledygook to one listener and like rhapsodic genius to another; in this sense, his musical aesthetic is located within the postmodern. via GIPHY via GIPHY These two GIF’s, the cats simulating a Jedi battle and Edward Norton’s character from Fight Club, can serve as a kind of juxtaposition to illustrate this dialectic between the notion of the asinine and the simulacrum. Perhaps this pairing of GIF’s can express this feeling of absurd distraction coupled with existential dejection better than this sentence performs or ellicits such a meaning. In speaking about this link between visual and linguistic narrative, Sousanis points out his conscious choice to remove discipline- and academic-specific language from his dissertation. Those words about education and schooling don’t appear in the text. How can one make something that people will read? Words in metaphorical language, verbal and visual, can engage people in their own place so that they can stay with the work and get something out of it without withdrawing away, letting the audience come up to the argument. Here, he’s making the...

CTW: Humphrey and Hulin

“Where can we find authority in a book with multiple authors working in different modalities? (Humphrey 5)” In his comic “Multimodal Authorship and Authority in Educational Comics: Introducing Foucault and Derrida for Beginners,” Aaron Humphrey explores the idea of authority and how it is embodied through multimodal texts with multiple authors. He does this by examining various examples of “An Introduction…” and “For Beginners” books, specifically those that speak on the theories of Foucault and Derrida. Experimenting with writing in a comic and analyzing collaborative comics allows Humphrey to question how we have previously viewed academic writing, and his techniques aid in decentralizing the voice of authority that is so prevalent in the academic sphere. Rachel Hulin pioneers a new kind of composition in her novel “Hey Harry Hey Matilda.” One of the captivating elements of her work is that it exists in two spaces: Instagram and a blog-style website. Her story follows twins Matilda and Harry Goodman as they navigate adulthood together; their dialogue features everything from relationships and psychological states to genetic testing and aging. The secret to their relationship, though, is that they seem to be fighting feelings for each other. Their conversations are nostalgic, yet modern and laced with anxiety. Hulin posts new segments of their story on Instagram every few days or so, sometimes every day, but it varies; alternatively, on the website, Hulin provides segments in posts that the audience can scroll through in chronological order. How do these pieces interact? Hulin’s work directly embodies Humphrey’s decentralization of authority. Whether the audience is looking at the story through Instagram or through the website, it...

CTW Response #3

Multimodal composition is more prevalent in digital writing and publishing now more than it ever has been since the Internet came into America’s homes less than twenty-five years ago. With writing being present in more digital spheres, an author must learn to create a piece that works together, and not against, with the medium that he or she is using. In Aaron Scott Humphrey’s article, “Multimodal Authoring and Authority in Educational Comics: Introducing Derrida and Foucault for Beginners” for Digital Humanities Quarterly, these questions arise when he examines educational comics. On the reversal, Rachel Hulin challenges these ideals in her visual novel, Hey Harry Hey Matilda, as the first-ever novel published entirely on Instagram. In Humphrey’s article, he discusses the educational comic books Foucault For Beginners and Derrida For Beginners (that is, the French theorists Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida). These books are learning devices, meant to teach the readers the basic theories of Foucault and Derrida using visuals and hand-written texts. He argues that while these texts were great examples of multimodality, the issue of agency comes into play. He divides the labor put into each book as three major roles: writer, artist, and designer. Each book had two different publishers, and this division and collaboration differed from each, for example, an edition of Foucault For Beginners had a two-to-one ratio; one writer to two artists and two designers. This type of relationship, however, can have a grave effect on the book (and sometimes) the writer’s overall meaning. Here, Humphrey examines Foucault For Beginners, published in 1993 by Writers & Readers, Inc. He argues that at times the...
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